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A beautifully told story with colorful characters out of epic tradition, a tight and complex plot, and solid pacing. -- Booklist, starred review of On the Razor's Edge

Great writing, vivid scenarios, and thoughtful commentary ... the stories will linger after the last page is turned. -- Publisher's Weekly, on Captive Dreams

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Headlines of the Week!


Our first headline is from the (Manchester) Guardian:

Thousands of chickens escape after lorry overturns in China

A "lorry" is evidently a truck of some sort, although the term does not seem Chinese.  This story is accompanied by video.  If you carefully watch the video, you will notice this at 0:08:

That's right.  The chickens are crossing the road. Why do they do that? (TOF hears you ask) A question that has bedeviled many a sage. The best answer -- it may have been Plato -- is that it is for some fowl reason.

A second headline, from the Miami Herald:

Gassy German cows blamed for barn explosion


Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2014/01/28/3897682/gassy-german-cows-blamed-for-barn.html#storylink=cpy
thankfully without a video.  But the notion that concentrated cow farts blew roof off a barn is not something you see every day.

 

8 comments:

  1. This inflamed the long-standing divide in my house, whether Kung Pao or Ga Xao Sa is the final cause of the chicken. Détente was temporarily achieved by proposing two weeks of comparative research.

    Or, as barnyard doctor says, "Now look what you've done! You've gone and given him a concept!"

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  2. "Lorry" the Manchester Guardian's word for truck. The Chinese word is ''ro-li".

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  3. Lorry is British English for "truck". The Chinese word is "kache", pronounced "kahtcher".

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  4. I suppose I ought to add that the lorry reference was TOF being tongue-in-cheek.

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    Replies
    1. I guess we all eventually get the readers we deserve.

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    2. Sorry. I think the tongue-in-cheek-ness was too subtle for my neurotic urge to find fault with things. As it was it just tripped my "what the hell else would a British newspaper call it" reflex, even though I could tell it wasn't meant seriously.

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  5. Clearly the first video shows an interpretive performance of the “Assemble of Foules”.
    - SteveP

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