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A beautifully told story with colorful characters out of epic tradition, a tight and complex plot, and solid pacing. -- Booklist, starred review of On the Razor's Edge

Great writing, vivid scenarios, and thoughtful commentary ... the stories will linger after the last page is turned. -- Publisher's Weekly, on Captive Dreams

Saturday, December 19, 2015

Dilbert Again


2 comments:

  1. Excellent. That reminds me - I should look into that whole 'grow your own food' thing I've heard rumors of...

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  2. I think I've seen this Dilbert character go into ultra-cynical prepper mode before. But let's talk about the term "first hour". It's worth exploring.

    I mean, even an ultra-cynical prepper cannot mean that as the first hour that the economy collapses, the massive EMP hits, whatever. Even in this up-to-the-minute age of information word simply does not spread that quickly, and any energy-based apocalypse will make both the collection and the acting upon information that much more difficult. And even the most sudden of neighbor-against-neighbor slaughters built up, overtly, over the course of eight weeks or so. No, she's thinking the first hour of a movie or a TV series.

    Implicitly, she's thinking that a societal collapse essentially turns people, instantaneously, into zombies. Soulless zombies you need have no compunctions about killing. Mindless zombies that you can fend off, indefinitely, by holing up with beans and ammo. You haven't got any obligation to honor toward zombies. You will, of course, recognize obligation as the very mortar of that "society" that, at bottom, she realizes is a thing very much worth having. But if everyone's a ravening murderer, there is no future anyway. Beans and ammo and solitude it is, then, not to any purpose, just to stave off grim Death for a moment longer.

    In reality, of course, she's the ravening murdering scavenger she fears so deeply. There are a lot of real preppers like this, and it seriously scares me.

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